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How to Approach Customer Experience Optimization Like a Scientist

Lauren Burgess  |  April 26, 2018

Lauren Burgess  |  April 26, 2018

        

Numbers are easy. Numbers make sense. They’re logical, we can easily see how they change over time and they provide a clear way of measuring success.

Unfortunately, people rarely communicate in numbers. When we describe the horrible experience we had while trying to purchase a cool new gadget online, we don’t say that the information was a 1 and that our frustration reached a 7. Instead, you exasperatedly tell your friends that the store’s website navigation was messy and confusing, the help chat connected you with a sales rep who knew nothing about the product and you nearly clicked away without putting your order in.

For the company’s analyst looking at surface level metrics, all they know is that you spent lots of time on the website, engaged with the online chat and made a high-value purchase at the end. All in all, a very successful transaction! Of course, you know differently. It was a miserable experience and one that you’re confident you’ll never repeat. In fact, you’re telling as many people as possible just how awful it was, so they won’t suffer the same fate.

The Challenge for Companies Gathering Qualitative Data

This is where so many enterprises experience the disconnect between what their metrics are telling them and what customers are actually saying. For a lot of businesses, the default response to this challenge is issuing surveys and feedback forms after customer interactions. We’ve talked before about why surveys rarely give you the full picture, but here’s a quick list of their main weaknesses:

  1. Creating surveys takes a long time, and input from multiple departments can make them bloated and confusing
  2. Response rates tend to be low
  3. Survey fatigue can lead to people abandoning it midway or rushing through
  4. Responses to questions are often polarized
  5. Timing can have a strong and unpredictable effect on results
  6. Analyzing qualitative feedback is challenging, and measuring the outcome of optimization efforts is even harder

As a result of these weaknesses, businesses that issue surveys end up with low-value data sets from small sample sizes. Anecdotal conclusions can be drawn but building an optimization strategy based on them is likely going to be a case of trial and error as opposed to a scientific methodology.

An optimization strategy based on survey responses is likely going to be a case of trial and error as opposed to a scientific methodology.

What Else Can Be Done?

By harnessing digital experience intelligence platforms, businesses can take the guesswork out of customer experience. Decibel, for example, records every interaction a customer has with your website and uses proprietary algorithms to tap into their mindset and intentions. Powered by machine learning, it tells you, based on the way a customer moves around your digital property, whether users are frustrated, confused or engaged.

If frustration or confusion is detected, the system alerts digital teams so that actions can be taken to remedy the issue. The data gathered is qualitative in nature, and quantitative in scale. You have all the information you would receive from a survey (and more), but it’s more accurate, reliable and valid — all without having to speak to a single customer.

Now we’ve taken it even further with the introduction of the Digital Experience Score (DXS®).

The data gathered is qualitative in nature, and quantitative in scale. You have all the information you would receive from a survey (and more), but it’s more accurate, reliable and valid — all without having to speak to a single customer. 

How DXS® Helps You Optimize Scientifically

DXS® is the first all-encompassing metric that distills customer experience across your digital properties into a single figure. The Decibel platform analyzes every customer interaction and scores your website or app on five pillars of digital experience:

  1. Navigation (Is the customer journey smooth?)
  2. Frustration (Is the customer annoyed?)
  3. Engagement (Is the customer captivated?
  4. Technical (Does the experience load promptly without errors?)
  5. Form (Does the customer have trouble filling in and submitting information?)

From these scores, your overall DXS® is determined. Your DXS® is a key performance indicator for your digital properties and can be tracked over time. The success of your optimization efforts can be seen at a glance, and thanks to the alerts and full suite of forensic analysis tools, you can see exactly where your focus should be.

To approach customer experience like a scientist, you need to have an intelligent hypothesis, a rigorous methodology, and a defined way of measuring your results. Our digital experience intelligence platform and DXS® allows you to do just that.

Getting Your DXS®

If you’re ready to pull on your lab coat and get stuck into the science of digital experience, get in touch today to organize your free demo. If you like what you’ve heard but want to take a closer look at DXS®, click the image below to download a complete guide.

DigitalExperienceScore

Lauren Burgess

Written on April 26, 2018 by:

Lauren Burgess

Lauren is a Digital Marketing Executive at Decibel.

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